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This Just In ...

Kevin Fischer is a veteran broadcaster, the recipient of over 150 major journalism awards from the Milwaukee Press Club, the Wisconsin Associated Press, the Northwest Broadcast News Association, the Wisconsin Bar Association, and others. He has been seen and heard on Milwaukee TV and radio stations for over three decades. A longtime aide to state Senate Republicans in the Wisconsin Legislature, Kevin can be seen offering his views on the news on the public affairs program, "InterCHANGE," on Milwaukee Public Television Channel 10, and heard filling in on Newstalk 1130 WISN. He lives with his wife, Jennifer, and their lovely young daughter, Kyla Audrey, in Franklin.

Veterans can't afford school supplies for their kids. Will you help?

Help our Veterans

Veteran's kids need school suppllies - Will you help?


Did you know things are so bad for many disabled war on terror veterans that they can't even afford basic school supplies for their young children?

But you can give them the supplies they need to succeed this year by making a generous gift to the Coalition's 2014 Backpack Brigade Drive. Disabled veterans can't afford school supplies for their kids - Help today

Life is pretty tough growing up in a home with a parent whose body and soul have been shattered by war. These young children are truly casualties of the war on terror.

And on top of the instability and uncertainty in their home, there often just isn't any money left for things like basic school supplies.

After all, their disabled parent can't work due to his or her injuries – blinded, burned, paralyzed or missing limbs. And the caregiving parent often has to quit his or her job to provide 24/7 care.

When you're struggling to put food on the table, scrape together the monthly mortgage, or keep the lights on, there just isn't anything left for "extras" like basic school supplies.

The cost of school supplies adds up quickly. One annual predictor puts the cost of a backpack and supplies for an elementary school student at $189.24.
    That's a lot of money for a family who can barely put food on the table or pay the rent.
We recently gave emergency financial aid to Tony, a disabled National Guard serviceman who served in Iraq and Afghanistan. His family was days away from losing their Redmond, Oregon home before we stepped in to help.

But worse than their family's financial straits was the impact Tony's debilitating PTSD had on his nine-year-old daughter. Tony's wife told us when he returned from war, their daughter said it was like her dad never came home.
    "That guy that comes home every day -- he's not my dad anymore," the little girl said. "It's a complete stranger that walked in that door."
And Jamel A., an Army veteran who nearly lost his leg in Afghanistan, told us the hardest part of coming home was telling his young daughter:
    "Daddy got messed up. I'm not Superman anymore."
These kids know their disabled mom or dad -- once an indestructible superhero -- has changed. They can sense the stress and anxiety of their caregiving parent who's now carrying all of their family's burdens. And on top of it all, their family can't afford to stock their backpacks before they head off to school this year.
    But if our faithful Coalition supporters (like you) pull together, we can make a real difference for these heroes' kids who might otherwise go without basic school supplies like notebooks and backpacks.
Help the child of a disabled hero with  basic school supplies - Donate today

A gift of $25 could provide basic reading and writing tools for a child's first day of school. A gift of $50 will go a long way towards stocking a high school student's backpack for the whole year. And a generous gift of $75 could outfit one eager little boy or girl with desperately-needed school clothes.

And gifts of any amount will be combined to help get school supplies to as many disabled veterans' children as possible.

In some cases parents may use the money for other emergency financial expenses their family wouldn't be able to afford otherwise -- like buying a few new clothes for a child with a school dress code or putting a healthy breakfast on the table each morning before they head out the door.
    There's a lot working against these kids. They're adjusting to a new life with a severely disabled parent. They often spend a lot of time on the road, traveling back and forth to doctor's appointments with their parents. And sometimes they don't even know where their next meal is coming from.
So I'm counting on you to make a generous gift of $25, $50, $75, or whatever you can afford to the 2014 Backpack Brigade Drive today -- to help provide the money for basic school supplies and a nutritious breakfast for the child of a disabled American hero.

With gratitude for your generosity,

Major General John K. Singlaub
General John K. Singlaub, U.S. Army (Ret.)

P.S. I know you're a patriotic American who would never want a disabled veteran's child to struggle and fail because their family couldn't afford basic school supplies. So please make a generous gift to the 2014 Backpack Brigade Drive and help the child of an American hero who can't afford to buy his kids the basic tools to succeed and thrive this school year.

And thank you, once again, for your faithful support for America's wounded veterans and the Coalition to Salute America's Heroes!

Help the child of a disabled hero with  basic school supplies - Donate today

Providing Emergency Aid to Troops Severely Disabled in the War on Terror
Coalition to Salute America's Heroes | PO Box 96440 | Washington, DC 20090-6440 | www.saluteheroes.org | 1-888-447-2588
CSAH is a nonprofit 501(c)3 organization and contributions are tax-deductible.

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